It’s a seller’s market of like-new combines

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With most wheat and barley stowed in bins and elevators, and corn threatening to dent, this is the time of year when used combine prices are “vigorous” at best.

I love this term. Dan Sullivan of Sullivan Auctioneers once used it to describe how auctions were done on late model combines. That was just under two years ago, when agriculture was emerging from its commodity price sluggishness and farmers were eager to buy iron again.

It seems a lifetime ago with the supply shortages we’ve been experiencing. The good news is that the production of new combines is on the rise, helping to stabilize prices for used machines. Notice my use of stability.

The Pocket Guide tells this story. One-year-old Deere S780 and S770 combines are listed. I selected only combines with rear wheel drive (RWD) and front twins. The prices you see in the guide represent the upper end of the asking amounts for these models of combines. The list reveals the lowest to highest asking prices. I could not include all combines because at press time 227 S780 models and 124 S770 models were on the market. I selected the low and high values ​​and evenly spaced the asking prices between the two. Not that there’s a huge difference in that price gap.




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Note how narrow the ranges are for the 2021 Deere S Series combines listed below. Also note that combined usage has little to no impact on the asking prices shown in the Pocket Guide. This proves that this is entirely a seller’s market – and these sellers are sticking to their guns when it comes to asking for prices.

Asking prices and split times for 2021 John Deere combines

S760 (19 available)
Avg. price: $409,500
Price range: $379,900 to $455,000
Avg. Separating hours: 248
Separation time range: 175 to 316

S770 (124 available)
Avg. dealer price: $441,300
Price range: $381,000 to $524,000
Avg. separating hours: 351
Separation hour range: 95 to 650

S780 (227 available)
Avg. dealer price: $441,300
Price range: $399,900 to $589,000
Avg. Separating hours: 296
Separation hour range: 114 to 550

S790 (96 available)
Avg. dealer price: $511,900
Price range: $455,000 to $645,000
Avg. Separating hours: 316
Separation time range: 94 to 498

This is what you should do when it comes to selling or trading your harvester, whether it is green, red or yellow.

Yes, you pay more for like-new or brand-new combines. Nevertheless, you should also expect to get the best price for your harvester. So, before you sell or negotiate, go online and establish a firm price you must have. So stick to that price like glue. After all, it’s a seller’s market.

Asking Prices and Split Times for Older Model Deere Combines

2018

2016

2014

2012

S760 (10 available)
Price range: $224,900 to $367,500
Separating hours: 611 to 1250

S660 (15 available)
Price range: $164,900 to $235,273
Separating hours: 706 to 1725

S660 (24 available)
Price range: $116,500 to $265,000
Separating hours: 811 to 2,289

S660 (24 available)
Price range: $105,000 to $181,600
Separating hours: 1317 to 2410

S770 (56 available)
Price range: $184,500 to $450,000
Separating hours: 410 to 2,462

S670 (46 available)
Price range: $135,000 to $284,270
Separating hours: 584 to 2,146

S670 (56 available)
Price range: $124,900 to $311,900
Separating hours: 545 to 2,397

S670 (61 available)
Price range: $99,100 to $229,900
Separating hours: 1375 to 2850

S780 (174 available)
Price range: $239,900 to $459,000
Separating hours: 404 to 958

S680 (121 available)
Price range: $139,000 to $414,574
Separating hours: 448 to 2,122

S680 (143 available)
Price range: $119,000 to $272,400
Separating hours: 846 to 2943

S680 (104 available)
Price range: $93,971 to $217,100
Separating hours: 1003 to 3620

S790 (66 available)
Price range: $285,000 to $472,200
Separating hours: 380 to 1395

S690 (38 available)
Price range: $195,186 to $339,556
Separating hours: 716 to 1740

S690 (46 available)
Price range: $139,200 to $264,500
Separating hours: 752 to 2,851

S690 (41 available)
Price range: $106,100 to $217,000
Separating hours: 1,228 to 3,620

Upcoming auctions

August 20: Riechmann auction (riechmannauction.com) set its multi-farmer absolute auction for Okwville, Illinois.

August 24: Wieman Land & Auction (www.wiemanauction.com) holds its big annual pre-harvest sale near Marion, South Dakota.

August 27: The annual agricultural consignment auction with two sale rings is held in Hawk Point, Missouri, by Allen Auction & Real Estate Service (allenauction.net).

Money ringing in that line of old iron sitting in sheds

The massive expansion of online-only auctions (which allow you to sell equipment from your farm with the online buyer arranging for transport from there) and the proliferation of consignment auctions provide an opportunity to sell machinery little used or abandoned for cash.

“You can’t imagine the number of times I’ve been to a farm and the farmer has his old equipment in the machine shed and the new equipment outside,” says Mark Stock of BigIron Auctions (bigiron. com). “Most farmers have at least half a dozen idle pieces of equipment taking up space.”

Unused equipment, even when stored, loses value over time as its batteries, tires, hoses and seals deteriorate. As such, there is a cost in the form of lost value to keeping the equipment. A study by Iowa State University found that the economic life of most equipment is 10 to 12 years and 15 years for tractors.

Sometimes old iron goes up in value. A good example of this can be seen in the 1991 Case IH 1044 corn head which fetched $6,000 at a Wieman Auction consignment sale. A 1988 Case IH six-row head fetched $6,500 at the same sale. Both examples indicate the appreciation that occurs in small equipment that is no longer manufactured and, therefore, is highly sought after by part-time and hobby farmers.

Another example of older equipment values ​​increasing is a 28-year-old Case IH 496 drive that sold for $13,000 at a BigIron online auction. I did some research and found eight 28-foot-wide 496s that have sold for the past six months for $9,700 to $21,700.

Tractors from the 1960s and 1970s, especially muscle tractors over 100 hp, are sought after by collectors, driving up their value. An Oliver 1800 fetched $18,500 at an auction in Indiana.

Granted, these are outstanding examples of iron going up in value, but most machines are worth thousands of dollars in cash. For this reason, Stock advises you to take an inventory of unused equipment. You can consult an auctioneer or real estate consultant, or you can view past sales results online to appraise your unused equipment. After that, find an online or live sale to take advantage of the latent value of that gear.

Stock offers these tips for assessing the cash potential of your old machine inventory:

  • Take inventory of what you have. Take lots of photos as a keepsake to help you remember your gear.

  • Keep the gear that matters most to you, like the classic tractor you grew up with or the easiest-to-maintain tools.

  • Sell ​​the rest via an online auction.

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