New Louisville Farmer’s Market Enables Refugees to Grow Culturally Important Foods

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Refugees sometimes get sick after arriving in the United States due to big changes in their diet, but a new program in Louisville is giving them a place to grow culturally important foods they want and need. others, we grow to feed our families,” said Amir Hussein, marketing coordinator for Catholic Charities of Louisville Farmer’s Market. 10 years. “We’re growing specifically just because it’s something we’ve been doing for a while,” Hussein said. “My family, since they’ve been in Somalia, they’ve been farming since they came to America. Having the land to grow again, they’ve been farming whatever they can find.” Hussein is helping with the American Farmers Market organization’s new project on the West Market Street campus. This gives refugees the opportunity to continue their agricultural legacy. “These are farmers who farmed for generations in their home country before coming here and they brought with them their incredible skills and expertise,” said Laura Stevens, director of Common Earth. Gardens.Common Earth Gardens provide farmers with a place to grow their crops. Stevens said more than 400 families farm 16 acres at seven sites in metro Louisville. “And we are so proud to be able to support them and continue their family traditions and bring their rich cultural heritage and nourishment to our Commonwealth,” Stevens said. As part of National Farmer’s Market Week, Lieutenant Governor Jacqueline Coleman graced the program Thursday. “What better way to build community and support agriculture in our local communities than what we see here today,” Coleman said. But it’s more than farming for families like Hussein’s; it is their life. It’s a legacy he’s happy to carry on. “My dad is usually a businessman, so having the ability to run his own business is 100% his dream,” Hussein said.

Refugees sometimes get sick after arriving in the United States due to significant changes in their diet, but a new program in Louisville is giving them a place to grow the culturally important foods they want and need.

“We grow this to sell the majority of it, the other we grow to feed our family,” said Amir Hussein, marketing coordinator for Catholic Charities of Louisville Farmer’s Market.

Hussein, just 19, has been farming with his family since he was nine and selling his produce at Louisville farmers markets for 10 years.

“We’re growing specifically just because it’s something we’ve been doing for a while,” Hussein said. “My family, since they’ve been in Somalia, they’ve been farming since they came to America. Having land to farm again, they’ve been farming whatever they can find.”

Hussein helps with the organization’s new American Farmers’ Market on the West Market Street campus. It gives refugees the opportunity to continue their agricultural heritage.

“These are farmers who farmed for generations in their home country before coming here and they brought with them their incredible skills and expertise,” said Laura Stevens, director of Common Earth Gardens.

Common Earth Gardens provides farmers with a place to grow their crops. Stevens said more than 400 families farm 16 acres at seven sites in metro Louisville.

“And we’re so proud to be able to support them and carry on their family traditions and bring their rich cultural heritage and food to our community,” Stevens said.

As part of National Farmer’s Market Week, Lieutenant Governor Jacqueline Coleman graced the program Thursday.

“What better way to build community and support agriculture in our local communities than what we see here today,” Coleman said.

But it’s more than farming for families like Hussein’s; it is their life. It’s a legacy he’s happy to carry on.

“My dad is usually a businessman, so having the ability to run his own business is 100% his dream,” Hussein said.

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