Russian fertilizers cause problems for farmers and buyers

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High fuel prices and inflation are tough on farmers, but Russia’s war with Ukraine will have an even bigger impact on costs at the grocery store. Russia is a major fertilizer exporter, and these exports are under sanctions. With every bag of groceries, you pay the price of energy, labor and raw materials. No Russia fertilizer means months from now; food prices could rise. A Missouri farmer explains how he cuts costs. We do not set our price. Our prices are set by the Chicago Board of Trade,” said farmer and owner Adam Wolf. Farmers sell wholesale but buy retail. This is the opposite of most business models. It’s hard work. That’s why, five years ago, Wolf added organics to reduce the amount of fertilizer needed to grow his crops. Organics, in basic terms, are comparable to probiotics for crops. “Reduce our fertilizers, be better stewards of the soil using these products, and make even more money in the end by saving on input costs,” Wolf said. Her savings of about $100,000 reduce the stress in a year with so much uncertainty. “I think that door is just opening now, starting to open a lot more for organics in agriculture,” Mark Rothermich said. Rothermich is at Genesis AG in Riverside, Missouri, which manufactures organic products. He says many farmers are innovating in the way they do business. “Optimize farmers’ ability to conserve, reduce their inputs while maximizing production and profitability,” Rothermich said. It’s a natural way to increase food production, help the soil, and keep farmers from being crushed by rising costs. “What farmers are going through right now is an extreme version of what consumers are going through,” Wolf said. Due to the war, Ukraine is expected to expand and export less food, which will lead to increased sales to the United States. Farmers say commodity prices have risen and expect to make about the same price as last year.

High fuel prices and inflation are tough on farmers, but Russia’s war with Ukraine will have an even bigger impact on costs at the grocery store.

Russia is a major fertilizer exporter, and these exports are subject to sanctions.

With every bag of groceries, you pay the prices of energy, labor and raw materials. No Russia fertilizer means months from now; food prices could rise.

A Missouri farmer explains how he cuts costs.

His 2,500 acres in Liberal, Missouri, are part of a 4th generation family farm.

“It’s the opposite of any business you can really think of. We do not set our price. Our prices are set by the Chicago Board of Trade,” said farmer and owner Adam Wolf.

Farmers sell wholesale but buy retail. This is the opposite of most business models.

It’s hard work. That’s why, five years ago, Wolf added organics to reduce the amount of fertilizer needed to grow his crops. Organics, in basic terms, are comparable to probiotics for crops.

“Reduce our fertilizers, be better stewards of the soil using these products, and make even more money in the end by saving on input costs,” Wolf said.

Her savings of about $100,000 reduce the stress in a year with so much uncertainty.

“I think that door is just opening, and starting to open a lot more for organics in the agricultural sector,” said Mark Rothermich.

Rothermich is at Genesis AG in Riverside, Missouri, which manufactures organic products. He says many farmers are innovating in the way they do business.

“Optimize farmers’ ability to conserve, reduce their inputs while maximizing production and profitability,” Rothermich said.

It’s a natural way to increase food production, help the soil, and keep farmers from being crushed by rising costs.

“What farmers are going through right now is an extreme version of what consumers are going through,” Wolf said.

Due to the war, Ukraine is expected to expand and export less food, which will lead to increased sales to the United States. Farmers say commodity prices have risen and expect to make about the same price as last year.

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